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Youth Rifle Suggestions/Experience


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#1 applegatecontractor

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 08:29 PM

Hey guys and gals,

My oldest boy turned nine this may and is FIRED UP about hunting this year. Pretty sweet deal in the great state of oregon for youth that we call "Mentored Youth Hunt". The short of it is that once properly registered, my nine year old son will be eligible to fill my tags. He has a rossi .22 that also has a .410 barrel. Hoping to put him on a couple grey squirrel and grouse with his .22, both legal methods of take in this state. Also beginning to seek advice from friends, family, fellow hunters and fellow parents to young hunters. I have read a few posts about rifle selection in regards to youth deer hunts, but after a search of the site I cant seem to find them… 

 

So Im reaching out to those of you that are around this time of year and the crew that shows up come pre rifle season.

What deer rifle set up would you suggest for my son. Granted I will not put him on a buck until he proves his hunting ability on the above named species. He is a helluva shot with his bow, but poundage limits his ability to hunt with it. Also does well with his .22 and is becoming less afraid of the .410.

 

I wanna bring him thru the ranks right. I wasn't raised by a hunter, I got my dad into hunting and now we enjoy it together. My oldest son and I share the same passion. But I lack the experience of feet wetting that comes with teaching a young hunter.

 

What do you think about  rifle choice for deer hunting for a beginner, given I don't want to buy him a .223 just to replace it when he can shoulder a .243 or .308? And how did you parents of hunters teach your kids the way of the world in regards to hunting?

 

Thanks in advance!


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#2 Willy

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 05:14 AM

I would look into 7-08 cal.  pretty versatile round . For recoil look into limbsaver pads and barrel rings. Buddy has couple girls and they shoot

all different calibers with these on really well.



#3 blackfish

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 10:06 AM

I started hunting whitetail with a .257 Roberts and a 2x scout scope. Point of the shitty scout scope was that my father wanted me using the BINOS to look at things in the woods instead of "scoping" every other hunter or animal I saw! Shitty scope or no, killed my first buck and two does in three seasons of hunting.

Was a nice light rifle without a serious recoil. 

If looking to not buy multiple guns maybe start him on a .270 Winchester? Can still pop groundhogs, 'yotes, pigs, deer/antelope with a .270.

So the rifle would grow with him as you change up the "games" you guys play.

 

My 2 cents haha.

I am not a parent but was raised by hunters, and from my experience you wanna make sure your new hunting buddy has the gear to go with you on every adventure, because having Dad leave you at home because you don't have the toys to play is awful hahaha!

 

I have no real experience with modern factory made firearms, But many friends have told me that "out of the box" accuracy has vastly improved with modern manufacturing. Browning, Remington, Tikka all make quality firearms that friends seem to hold in high regard (but...who doesn't love THEIR gun right).

I just bought two Leopold scopes, and was really impressed by the Rifleman 3-9x50mm scope for around $200 I think (on Amazon of all places!).

 

Other questions to help determine your solution might be, do you handload for your rifles?

If so, maybe choose a caliber you already have all the bits and pieces (dies, shell holders, etc) to reload so that you don't "discover" some new expenses on that gear down the line!

Have fun with your boy! He will remember these days for the rest of his life!



#4 big bad hunter

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 10:30 AM

my dad grew up hunting , was a munitions expert in the navy 1942-1946 on aircraft carriers 

he trained me and my older brother to hunt , fish , camp anywhere and shooting like an expert .  i caught on 

he trained us from about 6 or 7 years old on 7mm mauser , 250-3000 savage and 257 roberts .

i outshot my brother with all of them but used the smaller 250 savage , my older brother used 7mm mauser  

my little brother still uses the 250 savage and has lots of kills but i will admit , he hit a monster bear twice and it still ran away 

i now use a 7mm mag but my backup is the 7mm mauser and pistol and m1 carbine and and and 



#5 meatbuck

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 04:21 PM

Killed my first buck with a 7mm-08 at age 13... Then was given .243 savage model 110 the next year. Still have it, my ol lady shoots it now as I now shoot the .270wsm model 70 Winchester...

Best advice I can give is get a recoil pad and do not let him get smacked in the eyebrow with the scope on his first trigger pull.

I think some of those Rossis come with .243 barrel too

#6 applegatecontractor

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 07:21 PM

Right on guys! Thanks for the advice so far. I always have heard .243 as a starter rifle, Ill check out the .257 roberts and 7-08 as suggested. Unfortunately I don't yet hand load any of my rounds… someday I hope. The idea of a pretty basic scope and better binocs seems REALLY sound, thank you for that. Any particular make/models for youth that y'all are experienced or aware of? I heard Mohawk in .243 from a friend but have never seen one in person. My wifey shoots a browning Xbolt .308 youth model. Its trick as can be and fits her quite well, but buying a brand spankin new rifle might be a little much ya know


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#7 meatbuck

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 07:51 PM

I believe the Mohawks to be "jumpy" rifles as the barrel is short..." Brush gun" is what I hear them referred to them as.

#8 Knokemdead

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 06:44 AM

I like all advice given but my fav for a youngster, as far as caliber, is the 7mm-08. Tikka has a nice youth rifle their offering.

 

My hunt camp has grown 4 into young men. Their fathers chose a 7mm-08, 2 - .270, and a cowboy .30-30.

 

Recoil pads are the best advice given. I it gives a young hunter a vote of confidence against the big bang. But hey, practice, practice, practice.

 

My two sons have walked the huntin woods with me at age nine (carrying binoculars) each year. California legal age is 12 and they were a few years experienced by then be sure to not choose to far a trek for a youngen if you prefer spot/stalk type days. When you sit, any type of quiet activity (crosswords, stick flickin, snackin) can keep an eager one occupied just a bit longer.

 

Overall though just have a no pressure good time in the woods and great things happen! Keep them in deer camp year after year!



#9 applegatecontractor

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 09:32 PM

I started with a recoil pad on my 300 win mag… and then kept it on there! Learning to handle the kick of a rifle was quite an experience for me and I hope to make it easier on my little dude than what I went thru. The guy I work for took his 12yr old boy out last season and they were lucky, his son picked of a forked horn with a 7mm-08. Ill pick his brain about it some more. Thanks again for the replies. My oldest boy grew up with me and my buddy hunting, he's rattled for bucks in late season as a six year old and predator called for bear and cougar as well. He loves our hunting trips, almost or maybe more than me, and thats saying something.


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#10 tjhunts

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 09:47 AM

I have been through this now with 2 daughters.  Started with a .243 youth rifle from Reminting.  Nice gun, pretty accurate, but the .243 can be a little light on boar.  Both daughters now shoot a 30-06 with controlled recoil loads from Remington.  This is a way better choice on our country.  We tend to see a fair number of hogs around the A Zone opener and that 30 Caliber bullet is way more effective than the .243.  Give it a try.  My oldest is ready now for regular loads...same gun.



#11 applegatecontractor

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 08:45 PM

How common are the controlled recoil rounds? Or do you have reliable source for them you wouldn't mind sharing? I like the idea of one rifle, as long as the loads are readily available.


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#12 meatbuck

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 09:14 PM

I think there by federal ... (Maybe remimgton)

#13 applegatecontractor

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 07:18 PM

Cool, thanks Mbuck. Any body have a hand load chart for reduced recoil rounds? My father in law just got a really capable reloading system from a friend of his, maybe he'd be up for doing some custom stuff if i can find the recipe


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#14 GreyFox

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 01:37 AM

Right on guys! Thanks for the advice so far. I always have heard .243 as a starter rifle, Ill check out the .257 roberts and 7-08 as suggested. .....Any particular make/models for youth that y'all are experienced or aware of?

243 is not a beginner's round, it's more of a seasoned expert round.  I use one and love it, and let new shooters practice and fun shoot, but for living breathing animals, I suggest going bigger,   7-08 is minimum,  of course the 257 is much better than on paper but is not readily available.

 

For rifles,  for youth, you really can't do any better than the Mossberg 100 series,  try to get one used,  (they a seldom available because no one is selling theirs used)

 

Realize money is tight for most everyone, but it is an INVESTMENT.



#15 meatbuck

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 09:34 AM

Can you elaborate on why the .243 is not a beginners round?

To me a youth rifle is only going to be used for a short period of time... Then it's on to something bigger(gun or caliber)... Meanwhile the youth gun sits untouched in a safe or closet until the next kid or grandkid comes of shooting age. Most kids are far too big for a youth model Years before they can even purchase a gun.

And soon you won't be able to lend your gun to anyone so if your co workers kid or your buddy's wife(examples) need a youth gun for a hunt or whatever you won't be able to pull it out for them either... So it will likely continue to sit and collect dust.
Something to think about before you buy.

#16 Hoss

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 04:07 PM

I shot a 243 as a youth and both of my teenage twin boys shot 243's with great success! lightweight short action caliber with little recoil that youth shoot really well.

 

We put many deer down with the 243!!! Great for coyotes as well!!!

 

all the above advice is spot on as well, just wanted to give my experience



#17 applegatecontractor

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 09:05 PM

Wow, once again I appreciate the firsthand experience and opinions. So far I have already learned a lot from all of you. Thank you


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#18 GreyFox

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 02:24 AM

243 is a GREAT round, please don't get me wrong, I love mine BUT it is NOT what I'd have someone START with HUNTING.

If's the 243 is a "great" beginner round, then the 22-250 or 223 would be "better"  (recoil, noise, etc...)  

Hit an animal right with one, they are magic,  muff the shot (as in any caliber) and there's a  tracking job and follow up shot and a wounded animal.

I shot a very large body whitetail at 60 yds, in thick stuff and hit a little too far forward (shoulder) - no blood trail (no exit wound) and he only went may 70 yds but it was all thick,  took a while to find him.  Others I've hit behind the  shoulder and they went maybe 15 yds max, with a trail Stevie Wonder could follow.

 

I realize size or energy does not make up for cruddy shooting, but we all pull shots, we all miss, hut long enough and you'll make a bad shot.   I'd rather have a larger bullet make a bad shot than a 243.   That's all.

 

FWIW, My son killed his first two with a 223 and I've taken ONE with a 223 and I do not consider it a deer round either.  I worked up 60 gr Nosler Partition loads, and whacked a small buck - same experience with the large buck and a 243 - no blood trail, thick cover - maybe 50 yds of fan searching before I stumbled upon him.

 

If I was doing it again - grand kids someday I hope - Today I'd get a Mossberg 100 series with the stock that you add on to as the person grows -  I'd get a 243 for practice, and when they  were ready to hunt, probably switch to a .308.  Then I'd take the 243 and rebarrel to a 338 Fed or a 358 Win and he (or she) would be set for anything in NA and most stuff in the world (save dangerous game or places where minimal calibers/energy are required)



#19 GreyFox

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 02:40 AM

Something like this:

 

http://www.gunbroker.../item/577252839

or this :  http://www.gunbroker.../item/576750023

 

NOT pushing gunbrokers or any dealer,  just using the example of the stock that is built up as the kid grows.  Also, If you're in really cold weather and wearing alot of insulation, you could shorten the stock to account for the extra length of pull due to the insulation.



#20 applegatecontractor

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 08:23 PM

I like the rifle stock there GF! Went to Sportmans wharehouse last weekend to see what they have to offer for a little man, after striking out at a very local sports house. No .243s at SW, said they get one every so often and its gone as soon as they get it… But they can't order more because "corporate" decides what they need and when they need it… Yikes… On the good hand while I was there a Marine helped me to look at a real nice simple rifle that ruger is offering, "the predator". Threaded barrel and synth stock. The threads probably would never see more than the stock cap, but seems cool either way. Looked at a .308, Marine said that ruger offers a youth stock for the rifle and that My boy may be able to shoulder the reduced recoil rounds that hornady puts out. So, I purchased a box of the RR .308 rounds. Came home and fired one of thru my .308, WOW, no worse than a .410. Thinking I will switch my wife to shooting these as she is jumpy with normal .308 and she won't shoot at a buck thats more than fifty yards away. My son was very excited to try the new round, until he watched me try one :) Then he opted to pass. OK I said. Now the deal is that he gets accustomed to his .410 and then trys the .308 reduced recoil round. Im hoping to borrow a friends .243 here soon and see how that goes for my boy. I have never fired a .243 so Im not sure how the .308 reduced rounds measure up. Anyway, the idea was that a .308 could be a rifle that would serve my son until he was old and gray, If it would grow with him from boy to man that is


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:





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