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Youth Rifle Suggestions/Experience


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#21 GreyFox

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 03:08 AM

You just hit upon a key point - It's his rifle,  let him decide!!   Father may know best, but father isn't carrying, shooting, or cleaning it!!

 

Ruger youths are good guns, no doubt about it,  Tikka is making a youth now,  I prefer the Mossberg, which are less $$, and love the stock lengthening concept, I've had a few friends buy them and have shot a few (very impressed!!)

But, when my DIL gets her rifle, it'll be a Tikka Youth,  probably a 7-08.



#22 kmorefield

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 12:03 PM

I started out with a Browning A Bolt in 25-06, which was light to carry, light recoil, and big enough for deer, antelope, pigs, bear, etc.  Granted, I was 12 or 13 instead of 9, but I was a pretty scrawny kid.  I would try to find a rifle that can last through the pre-teen and teen years (not something he'll outgrow) and in a mid sized caliber that won't pound him.  The 7mm-08 is a great round... My niece and nephew both have Marlin .243 rifles.  They are 15 and 16 and both want something bigger!



#23 applegatecontractor

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 09:28 PM

Thanks for the recent posts,


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#24 applegatecontractor

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 08:13 PM

So, My son really blew it and lost his hunting privileges for this calendar year. Lately tho he's been on the right track. Im thinking (don't tell my wife) that this christmas may be the time for Keith to receive a hunting rifle. .308 downloaded is doable, the reduced recoil rounds I purchased shoot like a hopped up .22. Ill update as "WE" make more decisions...


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#25 Viator

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 05:53 AM

If he is shooting a Rossi now I'd look at a Thompson Center single shot model. They are compact enough for a kid but with virtually every cartridge being availed in that platform including muzzleloading and shotgun barrels it can grow with them and give them with two or three barrels a gun that can hunt anything in North America.

#26 applegatecontractor

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 08:08 PM

I like the sound of that, I have a TC muzzleloader. Is there a specific model number you're referring to that I can research? Nobody locally has much for youth options.. I really like the idea of one trigger with many barrel options. Ill see what my friend Google knows. Thanks for the reply!


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#27 Goshawk

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 06:07 PM

I'm a bit different than most.
I don't like getting a kid a "entry level" gun, but rather a multi purpose gun that they can grow into that will serve in just about every capacity out there.  For our family, that boiled down to the 270 Winchester.  Lighter bullets are a joy to shoot, including the Hornady line of light hunting loads, yet stoked up is a very capable big game rifle from deer to elk and black bear.

Stocks can be trimmed and adjusted as needed to fit the kid as they grow, while keeping the same gun.  My son and daughter both cherish theirs now as adults with full power loads for hunting, knowing it was never a starter gun, but a big game rifle right from the start.

My daughter's 2016 Mule Deer taken at 125 yards was at a hard up hill run.  She's 28 years old now, so that's 19 years of the same gun and all the familiarity that goes with it.

Goshawk


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#28 applegatecontractor

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 09:43 PM

That is a great angle. Ive never shot a 270, though my best buddy shoots one. Gonna have to give it a whirl. Thanks for the input. We will land on a rifle here soon. Maybe for Xmas if my son can keep his sh$% together


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#29 GreyFox

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 10:38 AM

270!!   If I knew then what I know now I would not have went with a 7 Mag, I'd have went with a 270 or 280!!



#30 twodux

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 12:33 AM

I was old school. Started hunting deer at 10 with my dad's old model 94 Winchester 25/35. Then after a couple deer dad got me a new model 94 30/30. We were old school in our hunting also and hunted the timber and brush. I never hunted a clear cut until I was 18. Never had a need for a long range gun or a scope in those days. Then at 16 he found a nice used Winchester model 100, .308 semi auto for me so I'd have a good elk gun. Had a Redfield scope and a couple boxes of shells all for $100. That was a sweet gun but I sold it in a moment of weakness in my 20's. Had a Remington pump 30.06 for a few years then switched to a Winchester model 70, 30.06 that I used for a few years, then took a serious fall on an elk hunt hunt in the Olympic mountains and fell on the rifle, breaking the stock and tweaking the action enough that the bolt wouldn't work any more. So I had a Ruger Model 77 .250 Savage that I really liked for a deer gun, so I decided to go to a Ruger Model 77 with a stainless barrel and composite stock in 30.06 and have had that gun almost 25 years. It's my go to for everything now, having taken deer, elk, moose, and mountain goat and probably a dozen grouse.

 

My brothers both started out on the 25/35 and then moved to a .243. They got plenty of deer with their .243s and also each took their first elk with them. I wouldn't recommend them for elk, but they did both make one shot kills on spikes. But as a deer gun they are fine little guns and easy for a younger kid to handle. I'd have started my boys on a .243, but I already had the .250 savage which is pretty identical as far as ballistics, so I started them with that.



#31 Kirk

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 02:20 PM

Hey Bigbad,    wise choices on all of them but I gotta tell you that ittle sniper 250 savage is a brilliant blacktail rifle. I still take a Azone buck every year with it, but your right if hunting B-zones etc. where you need longer range and more umph, it's a little light., Preferred grain is only 100 as is the 243. Hard to get ammo for it as well.



#32 Leonten

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 09:30 PM

Hey applegate did you get your son a rifle yet?

#33 applegatecontractor

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 10:02 PM

Nah…. He's got to earn it. No sense in a deer rifle if your scared of a .410. He's getting there tho. Little dude is growing like a weed and will surely be able to shoulder a bigger bang than his .22 real soon. In fact I think He COULD handle it right now, its just confidence and lack of experience holding him back. Im not forcing him to shoot his .410, that might be the answer, but I figure he will graduate when he's ready, he's only 9 so why rush it. 

 

So, Ive left out a little which may have a real influence on decision when it comes to a rifle for my oldest, I have TWO boys, the younger is 4 the older 9. Seems like a .243 for my oldest is the way to go now, then he can pass it to his little bro and upgrade to the big boy rifle of his choice. Any thoughts on that?


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#34 GreyFox

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 10:57 PM

he can pass it to his little bro and upgrade to the big boy rifle of his choice. Any thoughts on that?

 

Yes, I have thoughts on that and they are not good.....    Why is the younger (youngest) getting the hand-me-downs?    Yeah, I was in that boat (Now, ironically, I'm the only one who hunts still...)  But, I was always getting the lesser.   If your older wants to "upgrade" then have him  take it to a local gun shop and trade up.    treat the younger the same as the older, let hin pick it out, it's HIS rifle,  if he chooses it, he'll tend to take more pride and ownership.

 

Kind of like buying a hand gun for your wife, if she didn't choose it, it's really not "hers".



#35 meatbuck

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 08:14 AM

A hand me down .243 is going to excite any child who has an interest in shooting... use the .243 as a starter for both kids and when they graduate from it, then let them choose what gun they want to shoot for the next few years (or forever). No sense buying a gun for a kid who may not want to hunt at all when he's old enough to make his own decisions.
I keep my .243 for coyotes and for the ol lady to shoot. My 9 year old will be shooting it soon enough.
Whatever you decide to do get a recoil pad for the youngsters guns, it will help with confidence and accuracy

#36 applegatecontractor

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 10:57 PM

Look. My oldest will most likely get a USED rifle, he IS and NEVER will be too good for that. The same is true for my youngest boy. I see no payoff in purchasing new, especially when the user is not the one paying the bill. If my oldest gets his $hiT together well enough to graduate to a hunting rifle that will be his honor. When he outgrows that rifle, I will give him credit like a gunshop would towards one that fits his new expectations. At that time I will have a proven rifle that has served my family well and earned respect as a firearm, so why should that rifle NOT pass to the next of my children that can shoulder it? If my oldest wants to keep it, fine, he can buy his own new rifle, not a prob and Ill buy my youngest son another beginner rifle, probably USED, because thats the bracket we are in.


Been following the SOCHI winter olympics. Still haven't seen the late season blacktail hunt…... :wacko:


#37 big bad hunter

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 11:04 AM

daddy's know best , dont let anyone tell you otherwise 

i was lucky growing up that my dad was a collector and had lots of rifles to choose from .

but first i had to prove myself worthy . good grades , good work habits and minding my parents and teachers and staying out of trouble . 

after that , i had so much fun shooting i didnt want to be bad . i wanted hunting and shooting all the time . 

dad was a great teacher . he grew up along with his 5 brothers providing the family with meat and birds . then he was munitions expert on air craft carrier in WW2 . sighted in weapon sights on planes and was ships  go to person when they needed a sharpshooter on deck to discharge a mine with a rifle . 

his training gave me top shot during basic training in the army . i tied with 3 others with perfect score of 200 hits out of 200 shots 

yep , daddies know best 



#38 GreyFox

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 02:02 AM

apple:  There is  a difference between "used"  and a Hand me down.

They are your boys,  you know what's best for them (At least you think you do!!!     LOL)



#39 Bigbuck

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 09:14 AM

I would agree with .243.  Recoil pads have come a long way in recent years.  I shortened a Ruger M77 and added a good recoil pad.  My wife shoots it all day and loves it.  It's not too much for a entry level hunter but it's also something they can shoot for years.  I even like to shoot it once in awhile.  



#40 Columbarius

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 02:46 PM

Hey, first post, but I've got to jump on the .243 bandwagon. I started on one and still use it for deer and pronghorn; it's a great round by me and hasn't let me down as long as I do the shooting like I'm supposed to. I use a win model 70 featherweight; it was a pain to carry when I was wee but it worked and it's a remarkable rifle in general




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